Heroes come in all shapes, sizes, and species


| Sergeant Reckless: A hero among horses and men |

George Washington, Martin Luther King, Mother Teresa, and our nation’s many other noted heroes were all rare and amazing people who accomplished extraordinary feats. Standing alongside these distinguished members of our past is another kind of hero, who was rare among men and its own kind. In 1954, a small Mongolian mare became a national hero when she was noted in a publication of the Saturday Evening Post. This hero’s name was Staff Sergeant Reckless of the United States Marine Corp.[emember_protected custom_msg=”Click here and register now to read the rest of the article!”]

The Mongolian wonder horse was purchased in 1952 by Lieutenant Eric Pedersen for $250.00 after he saw her at the Seoul racetrack. Lieutenant Pedersen was impressed with her and saw lots of potential in her ability to carry out combat duty.

Reckless was named after the 75mm recoil rifle that bore the same nickname. This rifle was first used during World War II and was being used during the Korean War as well. Each shell weighed approximately 24 pounds. Reckless was trained in the hope that she would be able to carry several of these shells at one time.

During bullet blazing battles, under extreme conditions, and blood-curdling tours, this small but sure-footed horse gave her heart to these courageous men by carrying ammunition to them. Robin Hutton of Morepark, California has dedicated many hours to memorializing the life and accomplishments of this true hero. After years of research and several interviews with soldiers that served with Sergeant Reckless, Hutton has written a book entitled, Sergeant Reckless American Warhorse, which is scheduled to hit the bookstores in November of this year. Hutton observes, “This horse has truly changed my life. She was such an inspiration to me.”

Reckless’s original Korean name was Flame-in-the-Morning (Ah-Chim-Hai). Hutton states, “When people ask me how I would describe Reckless, I always say, ‘She wasn’t a horse. She was a Marine!’ And that’s how I hope she will be remembered.”

CREDITS

story by DALE BLISS
[/emember_protected]